NPR Report Writing Tips: August 2011

by Joe Cocuzzo, Vice President – NPR Services

NPR Tip: Date/Time Stamp with Seconds (Client/Server or MAGIC)

Recently, a vendor receiving two exports of billing data from a MEDITECH system requested a time stamp be included so that if data from the same account appeared in both files, they could pick the more recent record. The MEDITECH scheme of storing the current time as number of seconds since March 1 of 1980 did not appeal to them.

Getting a date/time stamp of the format YYYYMMDDHHMM could be done with a computed field:

NPR Tip 1 image

If you use S(0) directly in your code, the translator will report an error, even though this is a valid MAGIC command, so @.sd is a better choice.

Once we have the value of “NOW” in seconds with @.sd we need to do four things:

Convert NOW into an NPR date (YYYYMMDD)

Convert NOW into an NPR time (HHMM)

Figure out the seconds that are “left over” so we can figure out the SS for a time expressed like this: HH:MM:SS

Format the time with some colons.

This would be daunting, except that we have some handy Z programs that will do most of our work for us.

%Z.date.in.magic(@.sd) will convert the S(0) value into an NPR Date YYYYMMDD

%Z.date.in.magic(@.sd)^DATE

%Z.time.out(@.sd) will convert the S(0) value into an NPR time HHMM

%Z.time.out(@.sd)^TIME

And if we remember (or calculate) that there are 86400 seconds in a day, we can use the \ operator (remainder on division) to figure out the leftover seconds:

If we get the remainder of the current time in seconds divided by 86400, we have the number of elapsed seconds since midnight. Getting the remainder of that value divided by 60 gets the leftover seconds.

@.sd\86400\60^REM

We need to pad the seconds with a leading zero, and %Z.zero.fill will do that as follows:

%Z.zero.fill(REM,2))^REM

Finally, we need to format the time and the leftover seconds with some colons and concatenate the string and return to the calling program:

DATE_” “_(TIME$2)_”:”_(TIME%1)_”:”_REM;

It is more efficient to get the system time once and put it into a variable, so the code in our utility macro program %Z.zcus.is.time.stamp.M.internal is:

DATE_” “_(TIME$2)_”:”_(TIME%1)_”:”_REM;

NPR Tip 2 image

A second version %Z.zcus.is.time.stamp.M.external puts the date in MM/DD/YYYY format

To test, call this Z utility from a computed field and place the field on a report. To see the seconds pass between records for this demo, I added a H(1) command to an AL D footnote also.

NPR Tip 3 image

With the H(1) to pause 1 second between records, here is some sample output from the two utilities %Z.zcus.is.time.stamp.M.internal(“”) on the left and %Z.zcus.is.time.stamp.M.external(“”) on the right.

NPR Tip 3 image

To save you the trouble of building this utility yourself. I have written both a C/S and a MAGIC version of the Z report that holds this macro. The reports have been placed in our library.
Z.zcus.is.time.stamp

http://www.iatric.com/information/NPRReportLibrarySearch.aspx.

You can find additional NPR Tips on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/NPRTips.aspx, as well as information about our on-site NPR Report Writer Training and NPR Report Writing Services.

Upcoming NPR Training Opportunities:

We are pleased to offer NPR Report Writer training sessions at host sites. Details and a course description are available on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx.

Location Level Instructor Date Cost
Greater Baltimore Medical CenterBaltimore, MD Beginner / Intermediate Jim Fahnestock September 13-15, 2011 $750
Greater Baltimore Medical CenterBaltimore, MD Intermediate / Advanced Philip Sherry October 10-12, 2011 $750

To subscribe for email notifications for new classes, please follow this link:

http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx

For more information or to reserve a seat, please contact Karen Roemer at 978-805-3142 or email karen.roemer@iatric.com.

(This article originally appeared in the August 2011 issue of Iatric Systems’ Updates! newsletter.)

NPR Report Writing Tips: July 2011

by Joe Cocuzzo, Vice President – NPR Services

NPR Tip: Finding records with empty fields (Client/Server or MAGIC)

If you need to write an NPR report and find all records with no value (nil) in a field, you can often write a simple selection EQ nil. For example if you want to find all entries in your discharge disposition dictionary that do not have a “billing code” (@ub82.code) field value,

Tip1

The reason this report works fine is that the @ub82.code field is a data field in the main segment, so the report can loop thru the main segment and test the field for a nil value and list all records for which the field is empty. (The report writer actually tests the length of the field and selects records where the length of the field is zero, it does not do @field=””.)

Tip2

Sometimes if a field is nil, there won’t be a record in the data segment. Let’s say you needed to write an NPR report to look thru the MIS discharge disposition dictionary for all entries that lack an Abstracting Tape Code for the “RATE” tape code. The problem is that until you create a tape code, no data will exist in the segment where the tape codes are stored.

Tip3

It might be clearer how this works if you look at a screen shot of a dictionary entry:

Tip4

The report below is doomed to get no records no matter how many unmapped discharge disposition codes you have in the dictionary. Any discharge disposition lacking a tape code for the “RATE” service will be invisible to the report, so even though the @abs.tape.code field is nil for a particular disposition code, for the “RATE” service, the report will not list that disposition.

Tip5

The solution is to write a computed selection field that looks into the child segment to see if tape code exists for a particular tape service:

Add a computed selection field to your report:

Tip6

In the computed select field, put the value “RATE” in the subscript of the child segment, then test to see if a code exists for that service. If NOT, then this is a record you want to select.

Tip7

With this report, we are able to list all the discharge disposition codes that lack an abstracting tape code for the “RATE” tape service.

Tip8

Since this month’s tip is generic, the example report was just built for illustration purposes and was not uploaded to the library. Visit our library to search for other tips: http://www.iatric.com/information/NPRReportLibrarySearch.aspx.

You can find additional NPR Tips on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/NPRTips.aspx, as well as information about our on-site NPR Report Writer Training and NPR Report Writing Services.

Upcoming NPR Training Opportunities:

We are pleased to offer NPR Report Writer training sessions at host sites. Details and a course description are available on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx.

Location Level Instructor Date Cost
Greater Baltimore Medical CenterBaltimore, MD Beginner / Intermediate Jim Fahnestock September 13-15, 2011 $750
Greater Baltimore Medical CenterBaltimore, MD Intermediate / Advanced Philip Sherry October 10-12, 2011 $750

To subscribe for email notifications for new classes, please visit: http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx

For more information or to reserve a seat, please contact Karen Roemer at 978-805-3142 or email karen.roemer@iatric.com.

(This article originally appeared in the July 2011 issue of Iatric Systems’  Updates! newsletter.)

MUSE – HL7 Education

HL7 Beginner

Delve into the world of HL7 standards, both in terms of HL7 today and what can be expected tomorrow. Let’s discuss the statement, “If you’ve seen one HL7 interface, you’ve seen one.”

Topics:

What is HL7
HL7 Messages Types – What do I need?
HL7 Segments
HL7 Fields Format
HL7 version 2.x vs. 3.x
Using NPR to create HL7 Interfaces (real-time vs. batch)
Future of HL7

Register for August 15, 2011 session & learn more.

Presenter: Ken Hoffman, Vice President, Iatric Systems’ Interface / Integration Division

HL7 Intermediate

Delve beyond the basics into the intriguing world of HL7. We will discuss the most common HL7 messages, segments, fields, communication standards, and HL7 Version 3 (XML). Topics will include the following with progressive discussion leading us to more advanced topics:
Detailed view of HL7 Messages, ORM, ORU, ADT and more
Discussion of Z segments
Communication standards, real-time vs. batch mode, web services
HL7 2.x vs. 3.x
Detailed look at version 3.x
Industry standards using HL7

Register & learn more for the  August 24, 2011 webcast.

Presenter: Ken Hoffman, Vice President, Iatric Systems’ Interface / Integration Division

 

MUSE Handouts

All MUSE handouts from Iatric Systems Ed Session & Workshops are now available on the web site.

  • Ed Session – Interoperability — Are You Ready? Ken Hoffman, Instructor (zip)
  • Ed Session – Mobile Madness – Steve Walker, Instructor (PDF)
  • Ed Session – NPR Tips and Tricks – Fun with Printers, Files and Executables – Joe Cocuzzo, Instructor (zip)
  • Ed Session – Patient Portals, PHRs & Healthcare Consumerism – Mark Johnson, Instructor(PDF)
  • Ed Session – What’s the Real Story behind Denial Management?, Kay Jackson, Instructor (PDF)
  • Ed Session – Why are ONC and Meaningful Use important to the Revenue Cycle? – Kay Jackson, Instructor (PDF)
  • Ed Session – Understanding Project Healthcare IT Risk Management – Mary Moewe, Instructor (PDF)

  • Workshop – Intriguing HL7 (file 1) & (file 2) – Ken Hoffman, Instructor (zip)
  • Workshop – MAGIC Syntax for NPR Report Writers (MAGIC & C/S) – Joe Cocuzzo, Instructor (PDF)
  • Workshop – NPR Report Writing for the Nursing Module (MAGIC, C/S, but not 6.x) – Joe Cocuzzo, Instructor (zip)
  • Workshop – PHA Report Writing (MAGIC, C/S and 6.x) – Jim Fahnestock, Instructor (PDF)
  • Workshop – Project Management 101 – Mary Moewe, Instructor (PDF)
  • Workshop – Qualities of a Successful Project Manager – Mary Moewe, Instructor (PDF)
  • Workshop – A Report Writers Bag of Tricks (MAGIC & C/S) – Joe Cocuzzo, Instructor (zip)

Visit http://www.iatric.com/MUSE2011 to learn more.

 

NPR Report Writing Tips: June 2011

by Joe Cocuzzo, Vice President – NPR Services

Formatting Phone Numbers (MAGIC or Client/Server)

In data export, you often get a specification that looks like this:

Field Length
Patient’s home phone 15
Patient’s Street 30

Often, the party receiving the data has a very specific required format for a telephone number, which they don’t bother to describe in their specification. They don’t realize that a telephone number in the MEDITECH HCIS can be any string that fits in the box.

Tip1

If we sent the IATRIC,JOE home phone number of “DO NOT CALL ME” to most vendors, they would reject the record and then reveal their secret phone number format requirement.

This month we will describe a phone number formatting utility that can take Meditech’s phone number data (any string) and return a desired format. If you want to skip all the geeky stuff and go right to our Client/Server or MAGIC report library and get the utility, feel free – I won’t be offended.

The utility accepts three arguments:
A is the phone number data
B is an optional default area code (in case the phone number data is only 7 digits)
C is an integer to control the format returned:
1 = NNN-NNN-NNNN
2 = (NNN) NNN-NNNN
3 = NNN-NNN-NNNN x NNNN
4 = (NNN) NNN-NNNN x NNNN
5 = NNNNNNNNNN (all digits)
6 = queued string |0 = area code |1 = exchange |2 = number

You could modify the program if you need a format that we did not think of.

The utility uses the “not tilde” syntax to remove all but the digits from the phone number data and then parses the phone number into an area code, exchange, number and extension, then puts the pieces together according to the format requested. If the data contains less than 7 digits, nothing is returned.

The ‘~ syntax is a variation on the use of the ~ “translate” command.

The translate operator takes each character of the string on the left, takes its ASCII value, and goes to that position of the string on the right and if a character exists at that position, the character is substituted, if nothing exists at the position, a space is substituted.

This is why “lower case”~$.L.TO.U returns LOWER CASE. The $L.TO.U is a system string that looks like this:

  !"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>?@ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ[\
]^_`ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ{|}~

The $L.TO.U and $U.TO.L system strings are a MAGIC platform feature. In C/S you use STRING@Tr.l2u or STRING@Tr.u2l instead of STRING~$L.TO.U and STRING~$U.TO.L

It contains upper case A-Z in the positions 97-122 so that a-z get converted to A-Z.

Using ‘~ (not translate) takes each character of the string on the left, takes its ASCII value, and goes to that position of the string on the right and if a character exists at that position, the character is substituted and if a ASCII 255 exists at that position the character is stripped.

In our utility we build a string that contains just the digits and a D(255) for every other position from 0-127.

The ‘~ allows you to build a “filter string” and remove all the characters you do not want, without needing to process each character of the source string in a loop.

Tip2

The macro call is %MIS.zcus.is.phone.M.format(A,B,C)

Here is some sample output of the various conversion schemes, including the syntax of the calls used.

Notice in the call to return the area code, exchange, number, and extention as separate queued pieces (format 6) the program does assignment to a list of local variables in {}

This is the equivalent to:
%MIS.zcus.is.phone.M.format(@phone,978,6)^RESULT,
RESULT|0^AREA,
RESULT|1^EXC,
RESULT|2^NUM,
RESULT|3^EXT
But %MIS.zcus.is.phone.M.format(@phone,978,6)^{AREA,EXC,NUM,EXT} is a much more compact way to write it.

Tip3

The report has been uploaded to our MAGIC report library as MIS.zcus.is.phone and to our C/S report library as MIS.USER.zcus.is.phone
http://www.iatric.com/information/NPRReportLibrarySearch.aspx.

You can find additional NPR Tips on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/NPRTips.aspx, as well as information about our on-site NPR Report Writer Training and NPR Report Writing Services.

Upcoming NPR Training Opportunities:

We are pleased to offer NPR Report Writer training sessions at host sites. Details and a course description are available on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx.

Location Level Instructor Date Cost
Greater Baltimore Medical Center
Baltimore, MD
Beginner / Intermediate Jim Fahnestock September 13-15, 2011 $750
Greater Baltimore Medical Center
Baltimore, MD
Intermediate / Advanced Philip Sherry October 10-12, 2011 $750

To subscribe for email notifications for new classes, please follow this link:
http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx

For more information or to reserve a seat, please contact Karen Roemer at 978-805-3142 or email karen.roemer@iatric.com.

(This article originally appeared in the June 2011 issue of Iatric Systems’  Updates! newsletter.)

Webinar Series: Make Your MEDITECH System Sing

International MUSE 2011 is over, but Iatric Systems summer webcasts can keep the learning going. Whether you attended or not, you can now expand your knowledge all summer long.

Register now for the sessions related to your most pressing challenges. Each presents valuable insight on how Iatric Systems product solutions help your facility improve patient care and advance your hospital’s clinical, financial, and administrative capabilities.

Make your selection and register now. Just click on the session links below to register. All events are at 2:00pm EST and complimentary. We look forward to your participation.

Date Day Webinar MAGIC/CS
6-29-11 Wednesday Empower Employees with 24/7 Access to Payroll Information Both
7-12-11 Tuesday 6.0 Reporting C/S
7-13-11 Wednesday Patient Privacy Monitoring Both
7-13-11 Wednesday Physician Office Integration Both
7-14-11 Thursday Monitor Results Verification Online Both
7-19-11 Tuesday Authorize the Release of Patient Information Both
7-20-11 Wednesday Public Health Interfaces Both
7-21-11 Thursday Eliminate Specimen Labeling Errors Both
7-26-11 Tuesday Monitor the Status of All Denials Both
7-27-11 Wednesday Physician Portals Both
7-28-11 Thursday Assess and Document Patient Care MAGIC
8-02-11 Tuesday Clinical Documentation MAGIC
8-02-11 Tuesday Interface Engine Both
8-03-11 Wednesday 6.0 Reporting C/S
8-04-11 Thursday Patient Portal and Online Bill Pay Both
8-9-11 Tuesday Patient Privacy Monitoring Both
8-9-11 Tuesday Assess and Document Patient Care MAGIC
8-11-11 Thursday Empower Employees with 24/7 Access to Payroll Information Both
8-11-11 Thursday Physician Portals Both
8-16-11 Tuesday Track Meaningful Use Both
8-17-11 Wednesday Monitor the Status of All Denials Both
8-17-11 Wednesday Computerized Physician Order Entry MAGIC
8-18-11 Thursday Medication Reconciliation & Discharge Management Solutions Both
8-18-11 Thursday Authorize the Release of Patient Information Both
8-23-11 Tuesday Interoperability Starts Here Both
8-24-11 Wednesday Patient Portal and Online Bill Pay Both
8-24-11 Wednesday Monitor Results Verification Online Both
8-30-11 Tuesday Workflow Management Solution Both
8-31-11 Wednesday Downtime Solution Both
8-31-11 Wednesday Authorize the Release of Patient Information Both
9-01-11 Thursday Interface Engine Both
9-7-11 Wednesday Track Meaningful Use Both
9-8-11 Thursday Recovery Audit Contractor Management Both
9-8-11 Thursday Downtime Solution Both
9-13-11 Tuesday Medication Reconciliation & Discharge Management Solutions Both
9-14-11 Wednesday Eliminate Specimen Labeling Errors Both
9-15-11 Thursday Interoperability Starts Here Both
9-20-11 Tuesday Public Health Interfaces Both
9-22-11 Thursday Patient Privacy Monitoring Both
9-22-11 Thursday Clinical Documentation C/S
9-27-11 Tuesday Computerized Physician Order Entry MAGIC
9-29-11 Thursday Physician Office Integration Both

For more information, please contact Pamela Brock at Pamela.Brock@iatric.com or
978-805-3170.

For an updated schedule, visit the Iatric Systems website.

The MEDITECH Community Bulletin: May/June issue

  • May 31st through June 3rd is the 2011 MUSE International Conference at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, TN and I’m sure many of you will be attending.  I’ve heard from a board member that this year’s conference is jam-packed with wonderful educational sessions and networking opportunities.
  • Planning to become a Certified Informatics Nurse? This month’s Industry Spotlight describes the “must attend” Nursing Informatics Review Course offered by Susan K. Newbold at the MUSE 2011 International Conference.
  • With another article on MEDITECH Data Repository, Ed Chisam of DR Validate offers some helpful information in this month’s Guest Spot column with his explanation of “Setting Data Repository Transfer Downtime to Avoid Errors”.
  • In this month’s Tricks of the Trade column, John Sharpe of Comstock Software explains “MAGIC 5.6 Report Scheduling Access”.
  • Our Featured Employer column this month features the Manager of Clinical IT Systems position at Sturgis Hospital in Sturgis, Michigan.
  • As usual, several organizations have provided press releases for this issue’s Recent News section.

Read the whole MEDITECH Community Bulletin.

NPR Report Writing Tips

by Joe Cocuzzo, Vice President – NPR Services

Avoiding Fragments (MAGIC this time. . . )

Last month we showed how to cross applications without using fragments in a Client/Server (C/S ) NPR report. This month it is MAGIC’s turn.

The “official” technique for crossing applications in an NPR report is to write another report as a fragment and call it via the utility program %Z.rw.fragment. The fragment then takes over and
prints, or puts some data in /R.FRAG.VAL, which you use in some computed fields or an “MV” array back in the main report to print the data from the other application.

Fragments allow you to cross applications without needing to write any loops, but they carry a sizable performance penalty. Also, it is more difficult to maintain a main report and one or more fragment
reports, especially as the fragment calls tend to be hidden in line checks, ECB attributes, or computed fields.

This month we will show a MAGIC version of a patient export from Abstracting with patient address information from MRI.DRC.

Last month we showed how to avoid fragments in C/S by using the %Z.rw.fragment program with no “A” argument (that is, no report name) or the %Z.link.db program to open the MRI database. In MAGIC we cannot use Z.rw.fragment in this way, and the Z.link.db program does not exist. Instead, we can use the %Z.link program to open the prefix we need.

NOTE: If you are unfamiliar with opening and managing prefixes, you should develop your report in the TEST environment and make sure it performs properly before running it in LIVE. If you want
to learn more about the MAGIC programming language generally, MEDITECH has an “Introduction to MAGIC” and a “MAGIC Reference Manual” that you might be able to request.

Tip4

We use @mri.urn as the HK1 sort, so the local variable mri.urn (ea) contains the patient’s medical records urn. This means that if we open the MRI database, fields stored by the patient’s medical records urn will be available. Notice that ? is the prefix the translator will use for the MRI.DRC fields we want to retrieve.

?prefix

We use a sort in our report on the mri.urn of the patient, which means we will have one HK1 region on our report per patient, and we will suppress the detail section of the report. In a macro called
before the printing of the HK1 region we will open ? to the MRI datafile and get the patient’s address fields and put them in local variables.

MEDITECH has a utility program that you can use to open any prefix to an application data or dictionary file. The arguments are in the source code at the top of the program, so you can use the F4 key (get) and put \Z.link in the lookup box and see them:

\Z.link

The first thing we do is “close and stack” the ? prefix. This will allow us to re-open it back to the Abstracting data file once we have retrieved the address information from MRI.

Then we call the %Z.link program, passing the prefix in quotes (“?”), the application (“MRI”), the data file (“%.MRI.data”) and the database (“MRI.”_(@.db# “1.”)). We build the database name out of the
1th dot piece of the current database concatenated with “MRI.” So if the abstracting database is “ABS.STL” we would pass “MRI.STL”. If you have an Abstracting or MRI database that does not correspond in this way, you will need to adjust the code accordingly.

After we have ? “open to MRI”, we can get the address fields and put them in variables. We also check to see if the patient is expired, so we can set a flag to use in a LC to suppress such patients.

Finally we “close and unstack” the ? prefix, with the command C(?U). Although this is a “close” command, the ? prefix is re-opened to Abstracting when this is executed. The reason is that the “unstack” command “restores the prefix to its previous state.” That means that C(?U) and O(?U) do exactly the same thing. C(?U) has the advantage that it is not blocked by the NPR customer RW syntax checker.

How much faster is the “nofrag” approach to a report using a fragment?

At one MAGIC site, selecting a year’s worth of IN visits, the non-fragment report took 94 seconds to retrieve 5761 records:

A fragment version of the same report, run for the same set of records, takes five times longer:

Image 7

These example reports have been posted to our MAGIC report library: ABS.PAT.zcus.is.nofrag. ABS.PAT.zcus.is.frag (and MRI.DRC.zcus.is.frag)

http://www.iatric.com/information/NPRReportLibrarySearch.aspx.

You can find additional NPR Tips on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/NPRTips.aspx, as well as
information about our on-site NPR Report Writer Training and NPR Report Writing Services.

Upcoming NPR Training Opportunities:
We are pleased to offer NPR Report Writer training sessions at host sites. Details and a course description are available on our website at http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx.

Location Level Instructor Date Cost
Greater Baltimore Medical Center Baltimore, MD Beginner / Intermediate Jim Fahnestock September 13-15, 2011 $750
Greater Baltimore Medical Center Baltimore, MD Intermediate / Advanced Philip Sherry October 10-12, 2011 $750

To subscribe for email notifications for new classes, please follow this link:
http://www.iatric.com/Information/Classes.aspx

For more information or to reserve a seat, please contact Karen Roemer at 978-805-3142 or email karen.roemer@iatric.com.

(This article originally appeared in the April 2011 issue of Iatric Systems’  Updates! newsletter.)

MUSE: Tuesday Training

How do I manage my projects?
Project Management 101

This workshop will explore the key concepts and fundamentals behind PMI-based best practice management techniques.

Qualities of a Successful Project Manager

This seminar will explore the qualities of a successful project manager and how to improve project leadership skills.

Integration and Adoption using the Physician Care Manager in 6.0

This workshop will outline how a hospital, was able to implement and facilitate physician adoption of electronic documentation and order entry in conjunction with the implementation of a fully integrated electronic health record over a short period of time.

How do I train?
Designing Optimal Training for Your 6.0 Upgrade

This workshop will provide the tools that you need to conduct a thorough pre- and post-training analysis, prioritize and align training tasks with organizational initiatives and priorities, and select the most appropriate overall educational strategy for your 6.0 upgrade.

Key Strategies to Enhance the Patient Experience through Effective Use of the EHR

Learn about an integrated solution that supports your organization’s effective use of the EHR for key strategies such as Patient Centered Medical Home, Meaningful Use, and patient experience.

How do I get money?
Grant Writing:  Tips for Success

This session will include a presentation on grant writing tips, interactive discussion about miscellaneous topics involved with grant writing, and instruction on how to access websites used for finding grants and applying for funding.

How do I get MEDITECH data?
6.0 Report Writer Training

Migrating to 6.0? This workshop will highlight the new structures, new reporting tools, and terminology changes between NPR and MEDITECH 6.0.

Intermediate NPR Report Writer Training

This presentation will guide you through the underlying concepts of NPR Report Writing and introduce you to the next level of complex report development.

Magic Syntax for NPR Report Writers

This workshop will present the fundamentals of the MAGIC programming language as needed for advanced report writing.

A Report Writers Bag of Tricks

Learn valuable time-saving techniques and receive a complimentary tool box of utility reports in this workshop.

Thinking Outside of the Box with NPR Report Writer

Come join us as we demonstrate how to use the NPR Report Writer to do things that you never thought were possible.  We will take the Report Writer to new levels while learning more about standard NPR features, macros, and magic programming concepts.

NPR Report Writing for the Nursing Module

This workshop will show you how to write NPR reports to get the last time documented, post edit, skipping undo’s or get the documentation for a date/time range (post edit/skip undo) – and more!

DR Reporting Made Easy with Report Builder 3.0

If you have MEDITECH’s Data Repository, you already have all the tools to successfully develop a Business Intelligence (BI) environment at your facility.  Jump-start your BI functionality with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services (SSRS) using Report Models and the easy-to-use Report Designer tool.

PHA Report Writing

Learn how to write pharmacy reports that include administration data, laboratory data and present the new V2 allergies (including the comments) – and more!

SQL Tips and Best Practices for MEDITECH’s DR

We will help you get started with some best practices and SQL development tips that will aid you in writing efficient T-SQL code, building indexes, creating datamarts and managing your DR more effectively.

PHA Clinical Rules and NPR – Magic/Client Server 5.6 and Beyond …

This workshop will teach you about the world of Clinical Rules (PHA and some NUR/eMAR too!) and PHA-specific NPR reports and fragments.

Intriguing HL7

We will delve into the world of HL7 standards; both in terms of HL7 today and what can be expected tomorrow.

Learn more.

New NPR Course Offerings

Iatric Systems is pleased to offer the following NPR Training sessions hosted by Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland.

Class Details:
Type Dates Cost
Beginner / Intermediate September 13 – 15, 2011 $750 per seat
Intermediate / Advanced October 10 – 12, 2011 $750 per seat
Please visit our website for more information.  If you are interested in attending, please contact Karen Roemer at karen.roemer@iatric.com or 978-805-3142.